translating minor forms

Tag: culture

  • Folk tales, Coding and Old Ladies and their Cats

    Introduction Digitalising folk tales from cultures and areas deeply rooted in oral traditions and orality helps archive these tales, as well as the languages and cultures they derive from, and thereby gives them the opportunity to transcend time and space to reach more people. One might of course ask whether translating folk tales from their […]

  • Demarginalising Orature – Translating Minor Forms into the Digital Age (WiSe 22/23)

    Introduction In the winter term of 2022/23, I participated in the ‘Demarginalising Orature’ seminar, organised and held by Dr. Eva Ulrike Pirker, Tasun Tidorchibe and Jana Mankau. The seminar aims at “decolonizing knowledge and making knowledge (and primary materials) from a Global South context available in a responsible way” [1]. We, the participants, were “introduced […]

  • Last Session: Presentations

    For our last session on Thursday, 26th January, we were tasked with presenting the projects that we had been working on throughout the semester. We discussed the coding and video editing process and experience of the folktales of the Konkomba culture, while focusing on the various difficulties we faced and how to avoid mistakes. In […]

  • Introduction to video editing and subtitling

    Hello everyone!In this post I’m going to tell you a little bit about our last “Demarginalising Orature” session. As you may have guessed from the title, we talked about and worked on video editing and especially subtitling. In the past few weeks we have learned about Konkomba folktales, language and culture, we have worked with […]

  • Group Work: Encoding folktales

    In today’s session we did a presentation of our group work: Every group of two to three people encoded a folktale into TEI. We shared our experience with encoding itself, issues that occurred while working on the stories, and problems we had with the program Studio Visual Code. Issues while encoding The groups used different […]

  • Guest Lecture on The Sɩsaala Dirge by Dr. Confidence Gbolo Sanka

    Introduction Last week we listened to a lecture about Ghanaian funerals by Dr. Sanka. The lecture was mainly focused on the nature and qualities of the Sɩsaala dirges as well as answering what exactly makes them literary. What is a Sɩsaala Dirge? The Sɩsaala dirge is a versified expression of grief specific to the Sɩsaala […]

  • Aesthetics of Konkomba folktales

    The issue of library catalogues and classification We started the session by discussing this question: In which category can we sort Konkomba folktales? We watched a video of one such folktale. The storyteller uses gestures, imitates sounds, sings alone and with the audience, and uses intonation to create drama. So, which category fits the Konkomba […]

  • Guest Lecture

    As translators, folklorists, literary scholars and academics, we continue to grapple with documeting, translating and studying indigenous orature – be it their textual, oral and/or performance aspects. In the context of our seminar, Demarginalising Orature: Translating Minor Forms into the Digital Age, we present the guest lecture, “Indigenous Oral Performance: The Aesthetics, Documentation and Translation […]

  • [Addendum] Folktales, language and culture

    Introduction Hello everyone! This blog entry was meant to be published a while ago – sorry for the delay! Luckily, Anne also published a blog entry on that lesson of the “Demarginalising Orature – Translating minor forms into the digital age” seminar. I hope you have all read it, it was very informative and I […]

  • Introduction to TEI and its header

    In our session on November 3rd, we were introduced to the technological side of the course and one of its key goals: to create TEI documents of the Kokomba folktales. What is TEI? TEI is an XML-based format especially used for encoding texts of the humanities, such as poetry, drama, or registers of persons, but […]